Fire-Hose House – V

The Equipment
  • 150-250 ft. of cotton rubber-lined hose.
  • 2 Underwriters’ play pipes, 30 ins. long, with swivel handles, and 1-1/8-in. smooth-bore tips.
  • 4 to 6 Tabor spanners.
  • 2 fire axes, weighing about 6 lbs. each.
  • 2 1-1/4-in. X 5-ft. crow bars.
  • 2 canvas ladder straps.
  • 1 extra hydrant wrench.
  • 1 heavy mill lantern kept filled.
  • 4 to 6 extra washers for hose couplings.
  • 1 hand line of 5/8-in. Manila rope, long enough to reach roof of highest building to which department might climb.
150-250 ft. of cotton rubber-lined hose
hoseI figure there are two ways to make the hose.

  1. is to physically model it of course. The problem is that it isn’t round but a flattened cotton hose. I thought of using Sculpy by flattening a long cylinder of clay. The problem there is coming up with a way to roll the clay to a consistant diameter. It might be possible to glue down a couple of stripwood and using a flat piece of wood to roll clay back and forth until the flat strip rests on the pieces of stripwood. I also thought about using a small dia spagatti .. softening in boiling water and .. again .. using a couple of pieces of stripwood to roll it flat’ish.
  2. 3d print the hose completely rolled up. I like that idea more and more and have started a Sketchup file to experiment with how to do it. Note that this would allow printing the connections to the hose.

In the end it was really quite simple. .062″ solder flattened with a small hammer and anvil

2 Underwriters’ play pipes, 30 ins. long, with swivel handles, and 1-1/8-in. smooth-bore tips
playpipeThat’s an old playpipe in the photo but the new ones are very similar. Heck .. I hit the jackpot with a search and found the Approval Standard for Playpipes.

playpipe2In that document I even found a drawing (as shown to the left) – drawigns are a GOOD THING .. since I can use them for 3D modeling.

4 to 6 Tabor spanners
tarborspanner_1909Drawings of Tabor spanners from the early part of the century look different than modern versions. The modern versions have a hook .. the older ones a C-shape with a hole to grab the pin. The one shown in the drawing was from a book published in 1909.
2 fire axes, weighing about 6 lbs. each
axeFire axe has a chopping and a prying blade. I didn’t even bother trying to find a drawing of a vintage axe .. this is the kind of thing that has been around since ancient times I imagine.

I am printing these directly on the doors

2 1-1/4-in. X 5-ft. crow bars
40214The diescription of such a large bar is more of what I would call a pry-bar. When I was in the Army we called these “tanker bars” (I spent 12 years on tanks .. go figure!)

I think I can use a small hammer and copper wire to create these

2 canvas ladder straps
Ummmmm … what? Have no idea really at the moment .. unless it is something to tie the ladder off so it doesn’t fall. I am most likely wrong though ..
1 extra hydrant wrench
hydrant_wrenchThese are apparantly the wrenches used to remove the caps on a hydrant. I think the pic to the left is typical.
1 heavy mill lantern kept filled
milllanternThis is the lantern shown sitting on the top shelf in one of the earlier drawings. Fires happen at night after all. The example photo I found makes sense .. a heavy, sturdy lantern will take a beating and keep on kicking .. or whatever.
1 hand line of 5/8-in. Manila rope, long enough to reach roof of highest building to which department might climb.
Ok. That is easy enough .. a coil of rope long enough for the tallest building.


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