Fuel Tanks

Insipiration
a78I found this photo somewhere on the net. I’m not even sure what I am looking at. There are two tanks – what colors are those? *shrug* – all I can tell is that one is dark and one light colored. The dark colored tank has ‘No’ written on it – the light colored tank No.2 .. at least I think that is what it says. The underlined [u]o[/u] .. again .. shrug.

The ‘stop sign’ shape .. perhaps no smoking? There is that can mounted on the platform which has a pipe running from the dark tank. It has ‘Fuel Nozzle’ written on it. The hose runs from this tank. The ‘No.2’ tank has a hose running directly from it.

The pump (what I think it is) doesn’t appear to be connected to anything. It might be used to fill the tanks?

Dowel Tanks
dowelsI used some 3/4 in. dowels glued together to form the structure for the tanks. Two layers of cardstock (3in. x 5in. filecard) were glued to the ends and soaked with super-glue to plasticize the cardboard.

With sufficient soaking of cardstock with CA it almost resembles working with plastic. Once I sand those ends – using the dowels as guides I will wrap the form with more cardstock.

I want to point out that these tanks are being made using the simplest materials. The dowels were some I had left over from some project or another – the cardstock is simply some 3in x 5in file-cards. I simply ran some white glue down the side of a dowel and pressed the other against it. Once that had set up they were crudely glued to the cardstock. So .. you don’t have to spend a gazilion dollars .. just use what you have on hand.
Wrapper
Wrappers

Wrappers

Once the CA had dried I used some Automobile Primer to fill low areas. The tank was built by covering those two dowels with cardstock and when dry as slightly dished on the sides. I cut a couple of pieces of file-card with the width slightly wider then the tanks. This will give a little lip on the ends of the tanks.

There are several ways you can go with the tanks. Relatively modern tanks are welded and not riveted – and depending on who made it there might not even be much of a seam between the sides and ends. You could use the tanks ‘as is’ without the wrappers and simulate a weld bead where they join. The wrappers extend just a bit wider then the length of the tanks. You could also use some small dia wire glued inside that lip representing a weld bead. I’m again – trying to show that you can do things like this ‘on the cheap’
Gluing Wrappers
rubberbandsHere I’m gluing the wrappers on. When doing something like this test fit everything first – in this case the bottles of Allen’s Tacky Glue worked with the large rubber bands I had. I had a slight gap where the cardstock didn’t quite meet but ‘no worries’ .. that will be on the bottom and can be hid easily enough with some putty.
step1Here the wrappers are glued up. I soaked the paper with super glue. It worked well enough but ‘next time’ I will plasticize the cardstock wtih several coats of lacquer first.
Rivets and Stuff
primeredThe manhole itself is made using Evergreen tubing, the pupil from a large wiggle-eye and some cardstock. Pressure valve from styrene and vent tube from a paper clip.
rivetedThe rivets on the tank are Micro-Mark water-slide resin decals. The ones on the manhole-cover are Tichy.
Paint and Stuff
paintTheoretically the tanks held fuel and oil. I painted one green and one gray. No real reason for the colors other than that I likeed the contrast.
weathering2I have to admit that the weathering step is probably my favorite part of the process. I used thinned oils and some weathering powder to finish off everything.

Comments

Fuel Tanks — 7 Comments

  1. Edward, have followed your modeling and I’m a big fan of you work.

    The dark tank appears to have had written No (number) 2 Only and has been removed. you can also make out a 2 and some writing at the bottom. I assume the No 2 refers to the grade of fuel, which is close to diesel I think.

    The box below the dark tank looks like it could be a manual crank filler. it appears to have a handle to the lower left. doesn’t appear to have power supplied to it. Looks like the writing states, ‘FUEL HANDLE’ with arrow.

    Below the light coloured tank appears to have a t connector that leads toward the building. you can see the pipe continue at the left of the ‘stop’ sign. Then it looks like pipes headed toward the pump on the left. Look at the lower middle cross bracing on the left side. Or it could enter the building there.

    I believe the pump assembly is actually a parts bath. It is on a skid so it could just be stored there. There looks to be a 12″ I-beam beside the pump assembly. There is a ladder to the right, which could be used to fill the tanks. Looks like the ladder was salvaged from some other tank. It appears to be too long for its present application, the end is on the dark coloured tank.

    As for colours, the dark tank appears to have been painted from its original ‘white’, I’m guessing dark green. The No 2 on the ‘white’ tank is probably red. They would want it noticed. The shade differs from the two colours to be a reasonable guess. The stencil on the dark tank would most likely be white, which is the same shade as to the light coloured tank. The bricks on the wall are grey cement block, which is a shade darker than the light coloured tank.

    The support structure looks like it could be creosoted, so in the black range of colour. The dark tank is couple shades lighter.

    No Smoking does appear to be written on the stop sign.

    Just a few additional observations, hope this helps.
    Cheers, Heath.

  2. Heath –
    Excellent reply!! I love this stuff. The one thing that I wish more people would do is to reply like this .. which effectively turns this WordPress thread into a forum. I’m going to reply in separate boxes so I can add graphics if necessary.

    • The dark tank appears to have had written No (number) 2 Only and has been removed. you can also make out a 2 and some writing at the bottom. I assume the No 2 refers to the grade of fuel, which is close to diesel I think.

      I hadn’t even noticed that. Huh. So – do you think that there is another grade of fuel in the dark tank now? I’ll have to look around and find out what No.2 means .. as you say .. close to diesel. See what else might have been stored in the dark tank. I’m not too worried about keeping the diorama tied to an exact copy of what might have been stored there .. more interested in making it visually entertaining. Oil perhaps?

    • The box below the dark tank looks like it could be a manual crank filler. it appears to have a handle to the lower left. doesn’t appear to have power supplied to it. Looks like the writing states, ‘FUEL HANDLE’ with arrow.

      I enlarged the ‘box’. Still really can’t make out what it says .. but a manual crank is a good idea anyway. Like I said .. I’m into the visual ‘thing’ and that makes sense operationally .. in addition to just plain a good idea.

    • Below the light coloured tank appears to have a t connector that leads toward the building. you can see the pipe continue at the left of the ‘stop’ sign. Then it looks like pipes headed toward the pump on the left. Look at the lower middle cross bracing on the left side. Or it could enter the building there.

      You have excellent eyes. Enlarging that area I can see the t-connector. There is a valve above for all the lines .. and another just below the t-connector. So they possibly used the oil to heat the building too.

      I’ve already put a pot-belly stove in the little ‘office’ so I will probably forego that little detail unless you can figure another reason for having a ‘T’.

    • As for colours, the dark tank appears to have been painted from its original ‘white’, I’m guessing dark green. The No 2 on the ‘white’ tank is probably red. They would want it noticed. The shade differs from the two colours to be a reasonable guess. The stencil on the dark tank would most likely be white, which is the same shade as to the light coloured tank. The bricks on the wall are grey cement block, which is a shade darker than the light coloured tank.

      Sounds good to me. A dark green tank would allow some weathering to a lighter green. I don’t even have to really know what (if any) would be n the darker tank .. a .. ‘No.1’ would be enough.

      I like your interpretation of the colors and will go with them. The green and white tanks with red and white stenciling will work great to contrast with the browns and grays of the structure. Cool.

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