Kitforums Build – IX

Shed Clearance
Clearing the track

Clearing the track

Being cheap .. and having only occasional need for an On3/On30 clearance gauge I made my own from some styrene. Using this set the width of the crane framing and also the footprint for the shed. The red line shows the limit of how far I would intrude on the track. No big deal .. but that gave me what I needed to continue with the shed.

Concept
Concept Drawing

Concept Drawing

I was restricted by the wedge shaped area between the crane uprights, the track and the edge of the concrete structure. After some thinking I decided that “what they would have done” (which is how I do a lot of what I do) .. would be to build a small wedge shaped bottom and then a second story ‘office’ that could hang out and over the bottom.

Once again .. you have to understand that reality for me is just a concept .. not something I live with daily. Ha.

Lower Structure
Lower Framing

Lower Framing

I framed up the lower portion of the structure which will be a shed open on the front and the right (basically just an open door) to the platform. The idea is that they would need a place to store things for loading stuff on either a truck or flatcar – chains, crowbars, hammers .. whatever.

Upper Structure
Chipboard framing

Chipboard framing

I decided to drop the original concept for the office and instead use a yard shed that Clever Models had put up on their Freebie section. I had built this twice before and thought it would work fine. Since it is smaller than the original drawing it would leave a small platform in front of the door.

I wanted to model this with the door open so I decided to experiment and use chip-board for the structure. This makes for a nice, sturdy structure and with the paper siding glued on, it measures a scale 5-1/2 in. which works for me.

Paper sheathing
Sheathing

Sheathing

The bluish vertical siding in the photo is the Clever Models Yard Shed. It didn’t come with an interior (it was a freebie after all to whet your appetite) .. so I downloaded a texture sheet from Clever Models ($1.99) and used that to sheath the interior. This is an earlier photo and doesn’t show the trim – I used stripwood for the trim around the roofline and ends of walls (just easier) and cardstock from the print for around the door.

Corrugated Sheet
corrugated1-800I used corrugated to cover the lower structure. I used a disposable aluminum pan to get thick aluminum for the corrugated sheets. To create that corrugation I used a 1:48 Corrugated Metal Tool from Fassett Studios. The only change I had to make in the process was to use a tapestry needle to press the aluminum into the corrugations of the tool – that thick aluminum is a little bit much for my fingers. Note that the building on top has the trim applied at this point.
rusty2-800A closer look at the corrugated portion of the building after some more attention paid to it. One of the things I learned is that using a sharp scribe to poke ‘nail holes’ in the aluminum needs to be done prior to gluing the aluminum to the structure. You have a lot more control as I went too deep in places. The other thing is to pay more attention to the spacing of the framing. I had originally meant to sheath this part of the building in boards.

Of note is the “new” piece of sheet on the left. This bit was weathered as all the aluminum sheets were, using Radio Shack Etchant. In the case of this single sheet, I scrubbed the surface with a white weathering powder.



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